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A group of researchers from the Institute of Physics, together with an international team, studied the dynamics of water molecules in beryl crystals. As reported in their recent article in Nature Communications, they succeeded in proving for the first time that, at low temperatures, these localized water molecules tend to align, exhibiting so-called incipient ferroelectricity.

A team of researchers from the Institute of Physics and Institute of Thermomechanics of the Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS) recently published a study in the Science journal, which for the first time explained the mesomechanics of localized deformation in tensioned wire. Unlike other materials which deform homogenously, when NiTi wire is being stretched inelastic deformation proceeds via propagation of macroscopic transformation fronts separating transformed and untransformed regions.

Scientists from the Institute of Physics together with colleagues from Utrecht University developed a new method to image the electrostatic field of molecules at the atomic level. The work, which was published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications [1], advances our current possibilities to image individual molecules on a solid surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM).

International research team demonstrates electrical switching of an antiferromagnet Ferromagnets and antiferromagnets are the two common forms of magnetically ordered materials. Traditionally we thought that magnetism can be easily controlled and utilized only in ferromagnets. Researchers from the Czech Republic, United Kingdom, and Germany change this perception by demonstrating electrical switching of magnetization in an antiferromagnetic microchip.

During November 14 - 17, 2015, the Pierre Auger Collaboration celebrated the inauguration of AugerPrime. Spread over an area of 3000 km2 in the 'yellow pampa' in western Argentina, Auger is the largest cosmic ray experiment in the world. AugerPrime allows the Czech researchers to contribute to discerning the mysteries of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays until 2025.

The Pierre Auger Observatory is the world’s leading science project for the exploration of cosmic rays. The Observatory has achieved excellent results helping scientists to better understand particles with energies more than million times larger than the beam energy at the current world largest accelerator.

The electronic properties of solid state materials used in today’s electronic devices are governed by properties of valence electrons. One such property is the spin of the electron, which, in layman’s terms, is the sense of rotation of the spinning motion of the electron. As realized almost ninety years ago by German physicist Friedrich Hund (1896 – 1997), the electrons in a given atom all tend to spin with the same sense of rotation, a rule of thumb which is now called Hund’s rule

Researchers from the Institute of Physics and the University of Regensburg (Germany) introduced a new method of atomic force microscopy (Atomic Force Microscopy = AFM), which allows to resolve the polarity of individual chemical bonds in a single molecule. The possibility of the detailed resolution of the charge distribution in the chemical bonds within a molecule significantly advances our current possibilities to study the charge transfer at the atomic and molecular level.

Scientists from the Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS) together with colleagues from Osaka University in Japan presented in the journal Nature Communications [1] a new method that significantly advances the current possibility for atomic force microscopes to image chemical structures of individual molecules.

Recent developments in scanning microscopy enable us to resolve the chemical structure of individual molecules deposited on surfaces.

During a two-day meeting held on 15 and 16 July 2015, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Resource Board, with the participation of Czech representatives, decided to choose two sites for detailed contract negotiations for the location to host the world’s largest gamma-ray telescope network: a location in the Atacama desert in Chile in the southern hemisphere and Roque de los Muchachos Observatory in La Palma, Canary Islands in the northern hemisphere.

On June 29th , Milan Janata, a significant researcher of our Institute reached 80 years-of-age. Born in Teplice, Milan Janata graduated from a grammar school in Vrchlabí and, in 1958, from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering at ČVUT in Prague. After graduation, he had a number of jobs in which he was mostly concerned with the design of measuring and automation devices. For the FZU he worked in years 1963-1967. He rejoined the FZU in 1970 where he has worked until today. Milan Janata has authored or co-authored six inventions, six patents, a number of articles published in Czech as well as international journals.

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